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Author A. Saed Alzein on why finding lasting love is all about luck?

By. A. Saed Alzein, Author of ‘The Holy Book of Luck

Love is one of the purest feelings we as humans can experience, it engulfs every cell of our existence and turn us into emotional angels, we get the first sense of love the moment we were born, this tender embrace our mothers give us in the first minute of our life is love, the first kiss you get from  your father is love, the first cuddle from your siblings and as we grow older, we receive different forms of love at school, at college, at work, from loving neighbour, from beloved loyal pet and later with the ultimate life partner, the everlasting soul mate if we were that lucky !

Sometimes life is like the Lotto, where only a select few are fortunate enough to walk away with the Jackpot and the rest go home with nothing. We are all born equal in a way – we come into this world naked and helpless, but as time goes by some get a golden spoon with heaps of fortune, luck and success and the supply never runs dry. It is as if some invisible magical force follows them and makes them successful. These giants are so fortunate, their legacy lives on after they pass.

No love without luck

Not everyone can manage to get this sequence of love waves all their life, only little manage to pass their journey with abundance of love and care, but why?

In my book, The Holy Book of Luck, I explained that luck plays major role in our life, it is the one force which is underestimated and undervalued the most, we were indoctrinated the usual mantras about hard work and success, but how much hard work do you need to put to find one true love? Is it even logical to ask such question? can we quantify love? Ask any of those who chew the same old nonsense about hard work and success, why there are many broken, lonely hearts in our world today? Why many tried so hard but failed to find their true love? You will get all kind of the usual answers, but listen carefully and you will discover that behind these answers lurks one hidden word: Luck or its absence.

Luck looks like a golden thread running through the fabric of history, bringing together ancient gods, gamblers, philosophers, theologians, emperors, scholars, and slaves. Through the ages, humanity has employed all its ability, imagination, and knowledge to dismantle luck in an effort to bring good or to avoid bad. There are many theological myths about luck as an interpreter of predestination, and entire philosophical movements were developed to deal with its dominance, and new branches and applications of mathematics arose to analyse it. Generations of astrologers and fortune-tellers earned their living and profited from trading in it, but we have not yet succeeded in our hereditary struggle to domesticate or conquer this stubborn beast.

In love as in life, finding the right person in front of you requires lucky event, lucky accident and your both lucky stars must align together in one harmonious formation, both would be ready to receive love, both would be in switched on to receive love, all this requires luck, no hard work can put you in any situation where you can find your one true love.

It takes two to fall in love and this in itself requires lot of luck, but for this love to last for life means you are indeed very lucky person.

So What can we do?

Although I am a firm believer in the role of luck in our life, I also believe in the need to act, to vibrate, to send signals to the universe that you are ready to receive love, you need to go out often, be involved socially, meet new people and by doing that, you are might be inviting lucky events to your life.

No guest will arrive uninvited, so go on and start sending the invitations now and pray for luck to be one of those who will knock on your door one day.

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