Lifestyle Trending

‘Mystery, Suspense’ Review: Focusing on Deeper Insides of The Thrill

By Kelly Batchelor, Ph.D

Never knew that the thrill of suspense was tucked away inside of your mind.

Sometimes you feel like your mind has so much to offer, and your emotions play a massive role in who you are.  Of course, society says you should be one way; however, that is not always the case because being who you are is an essential aspect of life.

Author and Researcher Kelly Batchelor has been forced for years to be whom someone else has wanted her to be.  Batchelor was born in Goldsboro, North Carolina, the first of two girls.  She grew up in most parts of the United States because her father was in the Air Force.  Batchelor’s book allows her to use the thrill of suspense to paint the picture of the abuse she suffered for several years of childhood, including mistreatment and beatings by her mother, where her mother made her feel like all of it was for her good. Her teachers at school stepped in when she was 12-years old Batchelor was then placed in foster care.  At the age of 16, she went into the Free Will Baptist Children’s Home, where she was never abused again and offered love, hope, and an education.  At the age of 18, she went off to college and completed her Associate degree in human services in the hopes of helping other children like herself.  Then she went off and completed her bachelor’s degree in psychology and her Master’s in Counseling, and a Ph.D. in Psychology, hoping that her mother would accept her. 

During her college endeavors, she married her first husband, Jason (a pseudonym), with whom she had a daughter born legally blind with cerebral palsy.  Jason soon passed away, leaving Batchelor to raise their child alone while in college.  While raising her daughter, Batchelor had to find ways to provide an income for her child.  In addition, keeping the promise of helping others, she created a thrift store called “Shop for a Penny,” which is a non-profit organization helping other individuals in the community such as herself.  When Batchelor saw she was helping others and had completed her degree, she wanted to take time for herself and write, so she published a short horror book called “Short Country Horror Stories.”

Her book “Short Country Horror Stories” describes multiple stories she would witness her mother do to her as a child.  Her mother would put her in the broom closet; her mother would verbally tell her she would cut her up.  Her mother would put her in the garage and keep her there alone, and at night she would hear strange noises in the night. When Batchelor was a young girl, her mother left her alone and hurt and did not care. Each written story shows some form of abuse she suffered before Child Protective Services took her away to save her life. 

Either way, Batchelor turned the abuse that was a part of her world and used it to help others and bring them to life in a short horror book. Batchelor continues her writing to put other aspects of her abuse into another book, a more profound thriller.  Readers that have read her book express that it leaves you feeling like you are the character in the story, and the reader is waiting for that next move.

She has only written one book now; however, she plans to continue writing and publishing more books to help fund her non-profit organization to help other children in abused and neglected situations.  You can find “Short Country Horror Stories on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09MYTNN9N?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860

Similar Posts

THE NEW YORK TODAY IS AN INDEPENDENT E-MAGAZINE. IT IS IN NO WAY AFFILIATED, CONNECTED, OR ASSOCIATED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES COMPANY. The use of the name ‘Newyork’ is not intended to mislead or deceive readers in any manner. Any resemblance is purely coincidental and should not be interpreted as an endorsement or sponsorship by The New York Times Company.